Legal Communication

Legal Communication

Bogoch, B. (1999). Courtroom discourse and the gendered construction of professional identity. Law & Social Inquiry.  

Bush, R. A. B. (2013). Mediation skills and client-centered lawyering: A new view of the partnership. Clinical Law Review, 19(Spring), 429-488.

Conley, J.M., & O’Barr, W.M. (1990). Rules vs. relationships in small claims disputes. In A. D. Grimshaw (Ed.). Conflict talk: Sociolinguistic investigations of arguments in conversations. NY: Cambridge University Press.

Drew, P. (1992). Contested evidence in cross-examination: The case of a trial for rape. In P. Drew & J. Heritage (Eds.), Talk at work: Interaction in institutional settings. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Ehrlich, S. (2007). Legal discourse and the cultural intelligibility of gendered meanings. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 11(4), 452-477.

Felstiner, W.L.F., & Pettit, B. (2001). Paternalism, power and respect in lawyer-client relations. In J. Sanders & V. L. Hamilton, Handbook of Justice Research in Law (pp. 135-149). New York: Kluwer.

Goodwin, C., & Goodwin, M.H. (1997). Contested vision: The discursive constitution of Rodney King. In B.-L. Gunnarson, P. Linell & B. Nordberg (Eds.), The construction of professional discourse. London: Longman.

Hobbs, P. (2003). ‘Is that what we’re here about?’: A lawyer’s use of impression management in a closing argument at trial. Discourse & Society, 14(3), 273-290.

Jack, R., & Jack, D.C. (1989). The lawyer’s role: Partisanship, neutrality, and moral distance. Chapter 2 in Moral vision and professional decisions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jack, R., & Jack, D.C. (1989). Personal morality: The orientation of lawyers toward rights and care. Chapter 3 in Moral vision and professional decisions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jack, R., & Jack, D.C. (1989). Personal morality and attorney role: Changing perceptions of professional obligation. Chapter 4 in Moral vision and professional decisions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Janney, R.W. (2002) Cotext as context: Vague answers in court. Language & Communication 22, 457-475.

Mertz, E. (2007). The Language of Law School: Learning to “Think Like a Lawyer.” Oxford University Press.

Metzger, T.R., & Beach, W.A. (1996). Preserving alternative visions: Interactional techniques for organizing courtroom cross-examinations. Communication Research 23(6), 749-765.

Philips, S. U. (1987). On the use of WH questions in American courtroom discourse: A study of the relation between language form and language function. In L. Kedar (Ed.), Power through discourse. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Philips, S. U. (1990). The judge as third party in American trial court conflict talk. In A. D. Grimshaw (Ed.). Conflict talk: Sociolinguistic investigations of arguments in conversations. NY: Cambridge University Press.

Sarat, A., & Felstiner, W.L.F. (1989). Lawyers and legal consciousness: Law talk in the divorce lawyer’s office. The Yale Law Journal 98(8), 1663-1688.

Schrodt, P., Baxter, L.A., McBride, M.C., Braithwaite, D.O., & Fine, M.A. (2006). The divorce decree, communication, and the structuration of coparenting relationships in stepfamilies. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships 23(5), 741-759.

Stygall, G. (2001). A different class of witnesses: Experts in the courtroom. Discourse Studies 3(3), 327-349.

Tannen, D. (1998). Litigation is war.  Chapter 5 in The Argument Culture. New York: Ballantine Books.

Tiersma, P. M. (1999). Legal Language. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Walker, A. G. (1987). Linguistic manipulation, power and the legal setting. In L. Kedar (Ed.), Power through discourse. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.